Segovia: An Enchanting Stroll

Hi, everyone!

It’s so good to be back, especially with a new look and a more organized system. We’ve also introduced a new approach, and that’s gonna we be our little secret because we don’t want to spoil you all with sneak peeks of all the upcoming exciting surprises in 2016 ūüôā

We hope that 2016 has been treating you well so far. We’re going to present travel articles, still, and we hope to inspire you to visit a lot of places this year, because travelling certainly is in our resolution.

Segovia is a small town north of Madrid, Spain. It’s a town where it frequently rains and temperatures drop during winter. Segovia was a Celtic town that later¬†became a Roman city, though it was believed to be abandoned during the Islamic conquest of Spain. It was also known as an important wool and textiles trading center for its strategic position.

Walking from the local interchange
Walking from the local interchange

There are various transportation options from Madrid. Segovia is a 2-hour drive by car. You can also reach the town by bus, taking La¬†Sepulvedana bus from the Moncloa¬†station (14,31‚ā¨ for a 2-way ticket), or by train. There are 2 options to travel by train: to take the regional train¬†(2 hours) (from 8,25‚ā¨) or to take the medium distance¬†train¬†(30 mins) (from 12,90‚ā¨).

It is recommended to check the local weather forecast before travelling to Segovia, especially if it’s not summer. During summer, it is almost always sunny there, but if you’re lucky, you can get a beautiful sunny day in winter, like we did.

If you travel to Segovia by train, you’ll have to take a taxi or a bus to the city center and drop off. Most likely, you’ll drop off at the local bus interchange, which is the same interchange where you drop off if you go to Segovia from Madrid by bus.¬†From the interchange, we walked towards the city center. It’s easy to find the city center: you just spot a big pedestrian road and a small road for cars. You’ll find a church on your left and in front, tada! The famous aqueduct of Segovia.

Parroquia de San Mill√°n
Parroquia de San Mill√°n
The aqueduct of Segovia. You can spot the figure of the Virgin of the Aqueduct.
The aqueduct of Segovia. You can spot the figure of the Virgin of the Aqueduct.
To the right, you can find restaurants and it goes towards the city area.
To the right, you can find restaurants and it goes towards the city area.
But we're going to the left, to the ancient city :D
But we’re going to the left, to the ancient city ūüėÄ

The aqueduct of Segovia is an architectural marvel that dates back from the late 1st or early 2nd century CE. It consists of huge granite blocks and is considered the most important Roman engineering work in Spain.

From the aqueduct, you can go to the Tourist Information Centre and get yourself a map of Segovia. It helps as you venture through the alleys of the old town. But still, we’re going to the left of the aqueduct.

As you climb the stairs, you can see a beautiful view of the aqueduct's shadows cast upon Plaza de la Artillería.
As you climb the stairs, you can see a beautiful view of the aqueduct’s shadows cast upon Plaza de la Artiller√≠a.

We followed the way to find Iglesia de San Martín and Plaza de Medina del Campo. We continued towards a more crowded pedestrian street, but still going towards the Cathedral.

One of the main streets of the old town.
One of the main streets of the old town.

On the way, we saw an interesting gate to our left and decided to explore it.

And we found a beautiful park! Maybe it was because of the weather, but nonetheless, breathtaking! This is Paseo Salón Isabel II.
And we found a beautiful park! Maybe it was because of the weather, but nonetheless, breathtaking

We returned to the main street towards the Cathedral.

The cathedral of Segovia.
The cathedral of Segovia.

The Cathedral of Segovia is located at the Plaza Mayor of Segovia. It is the last Gothic cathedral in Spain and is known as “The Lady of the Cathedrals”. During sunny days, the¬†limestones basked under the sunlight create¬†amazing golden hues radiating from the cathedral towards the Plaza Mayor.

We then continued walking towards the Alcazar of Segovia.

This landscape greeted us at the to the right of the gates of the Alcazar.
This landscape greeted us at the to the right of the gates of the Alcazar.

The Alcazar of Segovia is a royal palace that is a favored residence of the¬†kings of Castile. The building has two courtyards, two towers, and a keep.¬†On sunny days, you should explore the¬†palace to the fullest, because some accesses are closed during cold rainy days. You’ll encounter decorated gardens¬†and¬†beautiful views, all while exploring a castle that also houses the Artillery museum.

The Alcazar of Segovia.
The Alcazar of Segovia.
One of the rooms in the palace.
One of the rooms in the palace.

If¬†the weather’s nice and especially sunny, and you’re physically fit, we recommend you to climb the Torre de Juan II. It’s a tower with steep steps and quite tiring to climb. But what you find at the end of the climb is inexplicable by words!

Segovia, from Torre de Juan II.
Segovia, from Torre de Juan II.
Mountains and fields, taken from Torre de Juan II.
Mountains and fields, taken from Torre de Juan II.

And we ended our journey with the Alcazar. We had to catch the bus back to Madrid ūüôā

Walking back
Walking back

Love,

San

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